Humans and Animals: Domestication

Humans and Animals: Domestication

By Katherine Hodge, Program Archaeology Interim Program Lead  Humans and animals have a long relationship that stretches back over fifteen thousand years. Some of the oldest human art on cave walls feature animals and some of the oldest carvings that have survived are...
National Parks: Rocky Mountain National Park

National Parks: Rocky Mountain National Park

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program Lead This week is the last post in the National Park series. In this series, we have covered a vast range of climates, ecosystems, and cultures that are all protected in the National Park System. They are some of...
National Parks: Acadia

National Parks: Acadia

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program Lead Acadia National Park may be small, but within less than 50,000 acres there is a massive amount of biodiversity, ecosystems, and cultural history. This week, we will dive into the first National Park east of...
National Parks: Mesa Verde

National Parks: Mesa Verde

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program Lead Mesa Verde is one of America’s most recognizable parks with its spectacular cave palaces. Since its creation in in June of 1906, the park has had millions of visitors and has consistently remained one of the...
National Parks: The National Park of American Samoa

National Parks: The National Park of American Samoa

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program Lead Gates of the Arctic may have sounded like the most remote National Park in the U.S., but the one to actually win that prize is the National Park of American Samoa. Located almost 5000 miles from the coast of...