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Humans and Animals: Tools

Humans and Animals: Tools

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadHumans use animals for far more than just food, wool, and companionship. Long before the advent of domestication, humans hunted animals and harvested every usable part from them. In addition to meat, hide,...

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Humans and Animals: Domestication

Humans and Animals: Domestication

By Katherine Hodge, Program Archaeology Interim Program Lead Humans and animals have a long relationship that stretches back over fifteen thousand years. Some of the oldest human art on cave walls feature animals and some of the oldest carvings that have survived are...

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National Parks: Rocky Mountain National Park

National Parks: Rocky Mountain National Park

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadThis week is the last post in the National Park series. In this series, we have covered a vast range of climates, ecosystems, and cultures that are all protected in the National Park System. They are some of...

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National Parks: Acadia

National Parks: Acadia

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadAcadia National Park may be small, but within less than 50,000 acres there is a massive amount of biodiversity, ecosystems, and cultural history. This week, we will dive into the first National Park east of...

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National Parks: Mesa Verde

National Parks: Mesa Verde

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadMesa Verde is one of America’s most recognizable parks with its spectacular cave palaces. Since its creation in in June of 1906, the park has had millions of visitors and has consistently remained one of the...

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National Parks: Mammoth Cave

National Parks: Mammoth Cave

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadSo far in the National Park blog series, we’ve discussed parks like Gates of the Arctic, which is known for tall mountains and gorgeous valleys, as well as the Everglades, which is known for its grass seas...

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National Parks: The Everglades

National Parks: The Everglades

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology  Interim Program LeadDark-stained, shallow waters with grass as far as the eye can see is one of the signature views within the 22nd National Park. The Everglades are well known for how its unique, fragile, and incredibly...

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National Parks: Gates of the Arctic

National Parks: Gates of the Arctic

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadGates of the Arctic is the northernmost National Park within the United States and is located in north-central Alaska. It is the second-largest National Park in the states, covering 8.5 million acres of land....

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National Parks: an introduction

National Parks: an introduction

By Katherine Hodge, Interim Project Archaeology Program LeadNational Parks were once called “the best idea” America has ever had. Born of the conservation movement in the late 19th century, the idea of a  National Park hwas brand new. Now, there are 63 National Parks...

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Conservation: New Developments

Conservation: New Developments

By Katherine Hodge, Interim Project Archaeology Program Lead There are many different parts of the archaeological process. Researching, mapping, and digging are important steps for gaining material to study. However, ensuring that material lasts as long as possible...

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Conservation: Underwater Sites

Conservation: Underwater Sites

By Katherine Hodge, Public Education CoordinatorIn this series so far, we’ve looked at how well artifacts are preserved in wet and dry environments. From textiles preserved in peat bogs to paper in Egyptian tombs. However, have you ever thought about how well...

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