Project Archaeology Blog

Check Out New Events, Updates, & Curriculum

Thanksgiving Blog: The Turkey Looks Great

Thanksgiving Blog: The Turkey Looks Great

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadWith Halloween behind us and Thanksgiving next week, a new year is fast approaching. As is our tradition, Project Archaeology has put together some excellent, free resources on how to teach Thanksgiving in a...

read more
Music and Archaeology: String Instruments

Music and Archaeology: String Instruments

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadThis week, we’ll be looking at the string instrument family.  String instruments are characterized by having strings that are caused to vibrate in some way, either by plucking or using a bow. String...

read more
The Archaeology of Fear

The Archaeology of Fear

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadI am probably one of the few archaeologists who will freely admit to enjoying the movie The Mummy, especially on Halloween. When researching the archaeology of fear, I immediatly thought of one scene . Around...

read more
Music in Archaeology: Percussion

Music in Archaeology: Percussion

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadI used to play in an orchestra. While we strings liked to think we were the most important, the reality we didn't like to admit was that the unsung heroes were the percussion players tucked in the back....

read more
Music in Archaeology: Drums

Music in Archaeology: Drums

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program Lead This week, it's all about drums. You may not immediately think of drums when listing musical instruments, but as part of the percussion family, drums play an important role in many musical traditions. There...

read more
Music in Archaeology: Earliest Instruments

Music in Archaeology: Earliest Instruments

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadIt is hard to imagine a world without music. In the modern world, it is rare to be in a place that is truly quiet. Music is always in the background of movies and videos, it is played in public spaces like...

read more
Humans and Animals: Religion and Spirituality

Humans and Animals: Religion and Spirituality

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadStarting with domestication around 14,000 years ago, dogs became a part of everyday human life. Millinea later all around the world, more animals were domesticated for their wool, meat, or strength. Much...

read more
Humans and Animals: Traditional Knowledge

Humans and Animals: Traditional Knowledge

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program Lead Modern humans and animals have lived together for tens of thousands of years. In that time, people have spread and adapted to almost every biome on the planet—even those  that archaeologists thought were far...

read more
Humans and Animals: Tools

Humans and Animals: Tools

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadHumans use animals for far more than just food, wool, and companionship. Long before the advent of domestication, humans hunted animals and harvested every usable part from them. In addition to meat, hide,...

read more
Humans and Animals: Domestication

Humans and Animals: Domestication

By Katherine Hodge, Program Archaeology Interim Program Lead Humans and animals have a long relationship that stretches back over fifteen thousand years. Some of the oldest human art on cave walls feature animals and some of the oldest carvings that have survived are...

read more
National Parks: Rocky Mountain National Park

National Parks: Rocky Mountain National Park

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadThis week is the last post in the National Park series. In this series, we have covered a vast range of climates, ecosystems, and cultures that are all protected in the National Park System. They are some of...

read more
National Parks: Acadia

National Parks: Acadia

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadAcadia National Park may be small, but within less than 50,000 acres there is a massive amount of biodiversity, ecosystems, and cultural history. This week, we will dive into the first National Park east of...

read more

Help Project Archaeology Save the World

Thank you for preserving archaeological sites, protecting the human past, and honoring the memories of past people through education. Every donation goes towards helping us keep our past alive.