Project Archaeology

Discover the Past – Shape the Future

Discover the Past – Shape the Future

Project Archaeology uses archaeological inquiry to foster understanding of past and present cultures; improve social studies and science education; and enhance citizenship education to help preserve our archaeological legacy.

Why teach archaeology 

Archaeologists ask questions rooted in the social sciences and research those questions using scientific methods. The fusion of social and physical sciences means that archaeology is an excellent way to teach students both scientific inquiry and cultural understanding.

Studying the past gives us a rare chance to examine our place in time and forge links with the human continuum. Everyone can touch the past, but sadly our opportunities are disappearing.  The number of sites that have not been disturbed or looted is dwindling at an alarming rate. Through Project Archaeology, educators can help the schoolchildren of today know and experience America’s rich cultural heritage as the adults of tomorrow.

Ten reasons to choose Project Archaeology

  1. Resources needed to teach these interdisciplinary units are included in the teachers’ manuals
  2. High-interest reading material in science and social studies
  3. Investigations based on real archaeological sites and authentic data
  4. Students “meet” members of descendant communities through each investigation
  5. Inquiry-based lessons are aligned with national standards
  6. Active learning – with numerous opportunities for reading, writing, and discussing
  7. Social studies, science, and math lessons are embedded within the curriculum
  8. A variety of assessment tools are included
  9. Online resources available
  10. Culturally relevant curricula for underserved audiences

What we can do for you

We provide services to educators, students and learners of all ages, and archaeologists in three ways:  1. High-quality curricular materials model authentic archaeological inquiry. 2. Professional development for educators including classroom teachers, informal educators, and archaeologists. 3. Support for Project Archaeology educators through state and regional programs, conferences, new materials, and networking opportunities. How can we help you? Click below for more information.

Professional Development

Our high quality, interactive inquiry-based curricula can be accessed through workshops, online courses, institutes, or job embedded mentoring.

National Parks: Gates of the Arctic

National Parks: Gates of the Arctic

By Katherine Hodge, Project Archaeology Interim Program LeadGates of the Arctic is the northernmost National Park within the United States and is located in north-central Alaska. It is the second-largest National Park in the states, covering 8.5 million acres of land....

National Parks: an introduction

National Parks: an introduction

By Katherine Hodge, Interim Project Archaeology Program LeadNational Parks were once called “the best idea” America has ever had. Born of the conservation movement in the late 19th century, the idea of a  National Park hwas brand new. Now, there are 63 National Parks...

Conservation: New Developments

Conservation: New Developments

By Katherine Hodge, Interim Project Archaeology Program Lead There are many different parts of the archaeological process. Researching, mapping, and digging are important steps for gaining material to study. However, ensuring that material lasts as long as possible...

Help Project Archaeology Save the World

Thank you for supporting our work to develop culturally relevant curricula, instilling cultural understanding, honoring past and present people, preserving archaeological sites through education. Every donation helps us connect people through our shared past.