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Project Archaeology – Leadership Legacy Institute

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. Chicago, IL – August 3-7, 2015


Take a leading role in archaeology education! The NEW Leadership Legacy Institute is a great opportunity for continued professional development for Project Archaeology coordinators, master teachers, and facilitators. The institute is also open to teachers, museum educators, and archaeologists. Learn cross-curricular, inquiry-based methods for teaching social studies, science, and health enhancement.


The Academy will focus on the curriculum Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter, an inquiry-based social studies and science curriculum, which guides students through a complete archaeological investigation of shelter.

Discover the past ~ Shape the future

Project Archaeology uses archaeological inquiry to foster understanding of past and present cultures; improve social studies and science education; and enhance citizenship education to help preserve our archaeological legacy.

“Discovery is nothing more than observing what is already there.”

From the Blog:


  • April 30, 2015

    I wrote the accompanying letter on the eve of my retirement from 24 years of teaching. I had seen many changes come to the field of education in that time period. What I noticed most was the growing lack of respect toward teachers by parents and admini …

  • March 31, 2015

    Join one of the 2015 workshops hosted across the United States in Kansas, Arkansas, Colorado, and more! Check out the Event Calendar or visit your State’s program page to request a workshop in your state. Five Hot Days in July by Virginia A. Wulfkuhle, …

  • March 9, 2015

    Harpoon Head. Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (St. Petersburg) (MAE 6488-72) As we learned in the last blog post, sea mammals are the most important resource for Iñupiaq peoples, as they provide the basic materials for food, shelter, and tools. …

  • February 18, 2015

    The word “Iñupiaq” (the plural is “Iñupiat”) might be unfamiliar to some teachers and students. It is the term that a large group of indigenous people in Alaska, those who live between Norton Sound to the south and the border with Canada on the Arctic …

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Project Archaeology depends on the continued support of our dedicated coordinators to bring archaeology education to the nation. Make a difference in education today!

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